Archives for September 2012

Advertising Week, IAVA Host NYC Job Fair for Veterans October 1st

Advertising Week, IAVA Host NYC Job Fair for Veterans October 1st

CONTACT: Hallie Seegal (212) 982-9699 or hallie@iava.org

MEDIA ADVISORY
Friday, September 28, 2012
Follow IAVA on twitter.com/IAVA

Advertising Week, IAVA Host NYC Job Fair for Veterans on October 1stGrey, JWT, Microsoft, NBC, Ogilvy, Y&R and over 20 more companies join
veteran hiring event in Times Square

WHAT: Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, the nation’s first and largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization representing veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, will partner with Advertising Week NYC to host an innovative jobs fair in New York City for veterans transitioning into the civilian workforce. The hiring fair is designed to connect Tri-State area veterans with top-notch advertising, production and media firms, supporting their transition from combat to the civilian workforce. This event follows a recent report from the Department of Labor showing post-9/11 veteran unemployment at 10.9% in August, consistently higher than the general population.

Pull quote: “As a Vietnam combat veteran and former Y&R Chairman, I applaud Ad Week NYC and each of these firms for stepping up to support our returning veterans.  I got my first job in the ad industry thanks to a fellow veteran who understood the value of my military service, and I know this event will open many eyes to the invaluable experience these men and women gained during their time in Iraq and Afghanistan. If given the opportunity, their leadership, resourcefulness and creativity will no doubt push the industry forward,” said IAVA Board Chairman, Ed Vick.

WHEN: Monday, October 1st, 2012 at 9:30AM-11:30AM EDT. Media are invited to cover for photos and interviews with IAVA’s Board Chairman and former Chairman of Y&R Ed Vick, IAVA Founder and CEO Paul Rieckhoff and unemployed IAVA Member Veterans. Media must RSVP in advance to Hallie Seegal, hallie@iava.org.

WHERE: B.B. King’s Blues Club and Grill, 237 West 42nd St., New York, NY 10036

WHO: The event is open to veterans of all eras. Veterans who wish to participate can sign up for the event here. Participating employers include: @radicalmedia, AICP, Aegis, AKQA, Chelsea Pictures, Curious Pictures, DDB, Emmis Communications, Grey, GroupM, JWT, Leo Burnett, Maxus, McCann, MDC Partners, Microsoft, Mindshare, Mediabrands, Mediaedge, MediaCom, NBC Universal, Ogilvy, Publicis, Red Car Editorial, R/GA, Uber Content, Universal McCann and Y&R. IAVA’s Board Chairman and former ad executive Ed Vick, Founder and CEO Paul Rieckhoff, and unemployed area veterans will be present.

If you are a member of the media who wishes to arrange an interview with IAVA Board Chairman Ed Vick, Founder and CEO Paul Rieckhoff or a local IAVA Member Veteran, please contact Hallie Seegal at (212) 982-9699 or hallie@iava.org.

Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (www.IAVA.org) is the country’s first and largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization for veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and has more than 200,000 Member Veterans and civilian supporters nationwide.

VA Surveys Return Important Data for Veterans’ Health

Health surveys are more important than you think. At first blush, they may be viewed as a drain on your time and energy in an already over-scheduled and stressed day. But in reality, a health survey is your opportunity to be heard on important issues such as your health status and how it may have been affected by your deployment.

VA uses health surveys to identify your needs as Veterans. After all, it’s your needs that drive VA’s service offerings, policies, and research efforts. VA’s Office of Public Health Epidemiology Program is currently surveying Vietnam-era Army Chemical Corps, Gulf War, and OEF/OIF Veterans in separate studies designed to learn more about their current health.

VA uses health surveys to identify your needs as Veterans

Veterans who participate in these surveys were identified from VA and Department of Defense databases to represent all branches of service and active, Reserve, and National Guard members. Each Veteran was chosen to represent Veterans with similar characteristics such as race, gender, and rank to ensure that the each Veteran population is appropriately represented.

Typically, it is necessary for researchers to use the same group of Veterans in follow-up surveys. This allows researchers to study individual health changes over time. If you are contacted and asked to participate in these surveys, please take the time to complete and return your survey! When you complete and return the survey, you will be helping yourself and your fellow Veterans by providing information essential to formulating future health care policy.

Here are brief descriptions of three active surveys.

Follow-up Study of a National Cohort of Gulf War and Gulf Era Veterans

This long-term study examines the health of Gulf War Veterans deployed during the 1990-1991 conflict. Researchers are contacting 30,000 Veterans, half of whom were deployed to the Gulf War and the other half who served elsewhere during that period. The study will compare survey data from 1995 and 2005 to help determine if and how the health of Gulf War Veterans differs from the health of other Gulf War-era Veterans.

Army Chemical Corps Vietnam-Era Veterans Health

Aimed at learning if high blood pressure (hypertension) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are related to herbicide exposure during the Vietnam War, this study targets 4,000 Veterans who served in the U.S. Army Chemical Corps between 1965 and 1973. Army Chemical Corps personnel were responsible for the application of chemicals during military operations.

National Health Study for a New Generation of U.S. Veterans

This 10-year study is one of the largest scientific research studies of Veterans. Targeting 60,000 Veterans, this study seeks to compare the health of 30,000 OEF/OIF Veterans with that of 30,000 Veterans who served elsewhere during the same time period. This 10-year study periodically collects data on health risks, overall health, health care use, and potential deployment-related exposures.

For more information on these and other studies, visit VA’s public health site as well as VA Research.

Source Article from http://www.va.gov/health/NewsFeatures/20120927a.asp

VA Surveys Return Important Data for Veterans’ Health

Health surveys are more important than you think. At first blush, they may be viewed as a drain on your time and energy in an already over-scheduled and stressed day. But in reality, a health survey is your opportunity to be heard on important issues such as your health status and how it may have been affected by your deployment.

VA uses health surveys to identify your needs as Veterans. After all, it’s your needs that drive VA’s service offerings, policies, and research efforts. VA’s Office of Public Health Epidemiology Program is currently surveying Vietnam-era Army Chemical Corps, Gulf War, and OEF/OIF Veterans in separate studies designed to learn more about their current health.

VA uses health surveys to identify your needs as Veterans

Veterans who participate in these surveys were identified from VA and Department of Defense databases to represent all branches of service and active, Reserve, and National Guard members. Each Veteran was chosen to represent Veterans with similar characteristics such as race, gender, and rank to ensure that the each Veteran population is appropriately represented.

Typically, it is necessary for researchers to use the same group of Veterans in follow-up surveys. This allows researchers to study individual health changes over time. If you are contacted and asked to participate in these surveys, please take the time to complete and return your survey! When you complete and return the survey, you will be helping yourself and your fellow Veterans by providing information essential to formulating future health care policy.

Here are brief descriptions of three active surveys.

Follow-up Study of a National Cohort of Gulf War and Gulf Era Veterans

This long-term study examines the health of Gulf War Veterans deployed during the 1990-1991 conflict. Researchers are contacting 30,000 Veterans, half of whom were deployed to the Gulf War and the other half who served elsewhere during that period. The study will compare survey data from 1995 and 2005 to help determine if and how the health of Gulf War Veterans differs from the health of other Gulf War-era Veterans.

Army Chemical Corps Vietnam-Era Veterans Health

Aimed at learning if high blood pressure (hypertension) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are related to herbicide exposure during the Vietnam War, this study targets 4,000 Veterans who served in the U.S. Army Chemical Corps between 1965 and 1973. Army Chemical Corps personnel were responsible for the application of chemicals during military operations.

National Health Study for a New Generation of U.S. Veterans

This 10-year study is one of the largest scientific research studies of Veterans. Targeting 60,000 Veterans, this study seeks to compare the health of 30,000 OEF/OIF Veterans with that of 30,000 Veterans who served elsewhere during the same time period. This 10-year study periodically collects data on health risks, overall health, health care use, and potential deployment-related exposures.

For more information on these and other studies, visit VA’s public health site as well as VA Research.

Source Article from http://www.va.gov/health/NewsFeatures/20120927a.asp

Online Toolkit Aims to Support Mental Health Providers Serving Veterans in the Community









Online Toolkit Aims to Support Mental Health Providers Serving Veterans in the Community


September 27, 2012



WASHINGTON – The Department of Veterans Affairs has developed a new online Community Provider Toolkit (www.mentalhealth.va.gov/communityproviders) aimed at delivering support, therapeutic tools, and resources to community providers treating Veterans for mental health concerns.


“Many Veterans seek mental health care at VA, yet many also choose to go to providers in their community,” said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki.  “VA is committed to helping Veterans wherever they may seek care.  This toolkit will enable those community providers who treat Veterans to better understand the specific issues Veterans face and help them access VA resources.”


The goal of the Community Provider Toolkit is to further enhance the delivery of mental health services to Veterans through increased communication and coordination of care between community providers and VA.  It not only provides information about accessing, communicating with, and, if needed, making referrals to VA, but also provides effective tools to assist Veterans who are dealing with a variety of mental health challenges. The Community Provider Toolkit also includes sections intended to increase providers’ knowledge about military culture. 


On Aug. 31, President Obama issued his historic Executive Order to improve mental health services for Veterans, Servicemembers and military families.  As directed in the Executive Order, VA is hiring 1,600 new mental health professionals and 300 support staff.  The Executive Order also directed a 50 percent increase in the staff of the Veterans Crisis line.


Last year, VA provided quality, specialty mental health services to 1.3 million Veterans. Since 2009, VA has increased the mental health care budget by 39 percent.  Since 2007, VA has seen a 35 percent increase in the number of Veterans receiving mental health services, and a 41 percent increase in mental health staff. 


VA provides a comprehensive continuum of effective treatments and conducts extensive research on the assessment and treatment of PTSD and other mental health problems.  Those interested in further information can go to www.mentalhealth.va.gov or www.ptsd.va.gov to find educational materials including courses for providers and best practices in mental health treatment.  They can also learn more about the award-winning VA/DoD PTSD Coach Mobile App, which provides education, resources, and symptom monitoring and management strategies.


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Source Article from http://www.va.gov/opa/pressrel/PressArtInternet.cfm?id=2394

VA Surveys Return Important Data for Veterans’ Health

Health surveys are more important than you think. At first blush, they may be viewed as a drain on your time and energy in an already over-scheduled and stressed day. But in reality, a health survey is your opportunity to be heard on important issues such as your health status and how it may have been affected by your deployment.

VA uses health surveys to identify your needs as Veterans. After all, it’s your needs that drive VA’s service offerings, policies, and research efforts. VA’s Office of Public Health Epidemiology Program is currently surveying Vietnam-era Army Chemical Corps, Gulf War, and OEF/OIF Veterans in separate studies designed to learn more about their current health.

VA uses health surveys to identify your needs as Veterans

Veterans who participate in these surveys were identified from VA and Department of Defense databases to represent all branches of service and active, Reserve, and National Guard members. Each Veteran was chosen to represent Veterans with similar characteristics such as race, gender, and rank to ensure that the each Veteran population is appropriately represented.

Typically, it is necessary for researchers to use the same group of Veterans in follow-up surveys. This allows researchers to study individual health changes over time. If you are contacted and asked to participate in these surveys, please take the time to complete and return your survey! When you complete and return the survey, you will be helping yourself and your fellow Veterans by providing information essential to formulating future health care policy.

Here are brief descriptions of three active surveys.

Follow-up Study of a National Cohort of Gulf War and Gulf Era Veterans

This long-term study examines the health of Gulf War Veterans deployed during the 1990-1991 conflict. Researchers are contacting 30,000 Veterans, half of whom were deployed to the Gulf War and the other half who served elsewhere during that period. The study will compare survey data from 1995 and 2005 to help determine if and how the health of Gulf War Veterans differs from the health of other Gulf War-era Veterans.

Army Chemical Corps Vietnam-Era Veterans Health

Aimed at learning if high blood pressure (hypertension) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are related to herbicide exposure during the Vietnam War, this study targets 4,000 Veterans who served in the U.S. Army Chemical Corps between 1965 and 1973. Army Chemical Corps personnel were responsible for the application of chemicals during military operations.

National Health Study for a New Generation of U.S. Veterans

This 10-year study is one of the largest scientific research studies of Veterans. Targeting 60,000 Veterans, this study seeks to compare the health of 30,000 OEF/OIF Veterans with that of 30,000 Veterans who served elsewhere during the same time period. This 10-year study periodically collects data on health risks, overall health, health care use, and potential deployment-related exposures.

For more information on these and other studies, visit VA’s public health site as well as VA Research.

Source Article from http://www.va.gov/health/NewsFeatures/20120927a.asp

Correction to earlier statement about the Veterans Jobs Corps Act of 2012

Correction to earlier statement about the Veterans Jobs Corps Act of 2012

CONTACT: IAVA’s Communications Department 212-982-9699

 

IAVA released the following correction to a statement regarding the Senate’s blockage of the Veterans Jobs Corps Act of 2012.

“On Wednesday, September 19th, IAVA released a statement regarding the Senate’s blockage of the Veterans Jobs Corps Act of 2012. Our statement incorrectly listed Senators Burr, Boozman, Heller and Toomey as authors of the aforementioned legislation. We apologize for this error. The original Veterans Jobs Corps Act of 2012 was authored by Senator Nelson and introduced in July of 2012. Last week, the Senate voted on an amendment to that original bill, which was authored by Senator Murray. Senator Murray’s amendment included elements from Senators Boozman, Burr, Hagan, Heller, Johanns, Murray, Nelson, Pryor and Toomey,” said IAVA Founder and CEO Paul Rieckhoff.

VA Teams Up with American Heart Association to Raise Awareness of Heart Disease in Women









VA Teams Up with American Heart Association to Raise Awareness of Heart Disease in Women


September 24, 2012



 Health and Fitness Event Will Run During Vermont Avenue Farmer’s Market


WASHINGTON – The Department of Veterans Affairs will raise awareness of heart disease in women, particularly women Veterans and VA employees, at a “VA Goes Red” health expo Thursday, Sep. 27, outside VA’s central office at 810 Vermont Avenue.  The event will run in conjunction with the FRESHFARM farmer’s market held at the same location from 11 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.         


“We are proud to team with the American Heart Association’s (AHA) Go Red For Women movement to raise awareness of heart disease in women Veterans and VA staff,” said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki.  “This event not only highlights our commitment to care for women Veterans, but it’s also a great opportunity to share information about cardiovascular disease and prevention.”


Activities will include healthy cooking demonstrations, fitness classes, health screenings and CPR instruction.  VA’s Undersecretary for Benefits Allison A. Hickey and Principal Deputy Undersecretary for Health, Dr. Robert Jesse, a cardiologist, will speak during the programmed portion from noon to 1:00 p.m.  AHA President Donna Arnett, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., and chairperson of the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health, will also speak during the event.


“With the number of female Veterans and women in the military rising, and Go Red For Women entering its 10th year, now is the time to unite in the fight against the number one killer of women and advocate for an increase in women-focused research,” said Dr. Arnett.  “Currently, 90 percent of women have one or more risk factors for developing heart disease, so we’re thankful for the opportunity to provide thousands of women with life-saving information about their personal risks through our relationship with VA.”


VA and the AHA announced their collaboration in May.  By combining efforts, the organizations can maximize their resources and share Go Red For Women’s messages and tools with women Veterans and VA employees.


The farmer’s market—which opened as a result of First Lady Michelle Obama’s mission to make healthy food options more accessible to the DC population—provides an ideal venue to discuss heart disease prevention strategies, which include exercise and healthy eating.


Women serve in every branch of the military, representing 15 percent of today’s active duty military and nearly 18 percent of National Guard and Reserve forces.  By 2020, VA estimates women Veterans will constitute 10 percent of the Veteran population.


Visit www.va.gov/womenvet and www.womenshealth.va.gov to learn more about VA programs and services for women Veterans.


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Source Article from http://www.va.gov/opa/pressrel/PressArtInternet.cfm?id=2393

VA and Entertainment Industries Council Launch Resource on Veterans’ Mental Health









VA and Entertainment Industries Council Launch Resource on Veterans’ Mental Health


September 24, 2012



Publication to Support the Creative Process in Film and Television Industry 


WASHINGTON – A powerful new tool is available to the entertainment industry with the release of Picture This: Veteran Mental Health Challenges and Solutions, a comprehensive guide to assist members of the creative arts community in accurately portraying mental health issues Veterans may experience. 


“I encourage those in the entertainment industry who seek to tell stories about Veterans to focus on the topic of Veteran mental health in ways that transcend stereotypes and present a more honest, compelling, and powerful product,” said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki. “The true stories of the Veterans I know and have served with are more engaging than a simple caricature of a Veteran with a mental health problem.”


The Entertainment Industries Council, Inc. (EIC), in collaboration with and sponsored by the Department of Veterans Affairs, developed this guide with input from mental health experts, Veterans, advocates, policymakers, the entertainment industry, and many others who are committed to honoring the service of Veterans and helping them overcome challenges.


Picture This was written to help writers, actors, producers, and others create authentic depictions of Veterans facing and overcoming mental health challenges. The publication was developed as a result of forums in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C., that brought together mental health experts, members of the entertainment community, and Veterans to share powerful testimonials of their own challenges and triumphs.


Discussions about the issues some Veterans face and factors that influence whether or not they seek help influenced the publication’s content. Picture This supports the creative process and is organized to address the needs of those developing entertaining story lines and characters that greatly impact societal perceptions.


Citing firsthand accounts from Veterans and their families referenced in Picture This and featured in VA’s Make the Connection public outreach campaign, VA’s Deputy Chief Consultant for Specialty Mental Health, Dr. Sonja Batten, states, “You can serve your audience, and in particular, our Nation’s Veterans, by allowing the real stories they share on Make the Connection to inform and inspire your work.”


Picture This includes background data on America’s Veterans and explains terminology on symptoms, conditions, and treatment options. Detailed information on mental health topics is accompanied by candid and unscripted accounts of Veterans and their family members who faced difficult life events and experiences, reached out for support, and found resources for getting their lives back on track.


“EIC has been fortunate to work with the Department of Veterans Affairs to support some of the most valiant and important citizens in our country. This effort serves to help returning Servicemembers take greater control of the challenges they face,” said Brian Dyak, EIC President and CEO. A nonprofit organization, EIC was founded in 1983 by leaders of the entertainment industry to bring the power of the entertainment industry to bear on health and social issues. 


On Aug. 31, President Obama issued his historic Executive Order to improve mental health services for Veterans, Servicemembers and military families.  As directed in the Executive Order, VA is hiring 1,600 new mental health professionals and 300 support staff.  Last year, VA provided quality, specialty mental health services to 1.3 million Veterans. Since 2009, VA has increased the mental health care budget by 39 percent.  Since 2007, VA has seen a 35 percent increase in the number of Veterans receiving mental health services, and a 41 percent increase in mental health staff. 


To see the joint VA / Entertainment Industries Council publication, please visit:  http://www.eiconline.org/eic-resources/publications/national/picture-this/VA-MH.


For additional information on VA, please visit: www.va.gov.  To learn more about the Make the Connection campaign, please visit: www.MakeTheConnection.net.


For more information on EIC, please visit www.eiconline.org.


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Source Article from http://www.va.gov/opa/pressrel/PressArtInternet.cfm?id=2392

Telehealth: A better way than the highway

Long Distance Check Up

Veteran Richard Martinez sat in the exam room while his nurse practitioner listened to his heart and lungs and took his blood pressure.

After conducting an electrocardiogram to check for heart irregularities, they discussed his health. What made this appointment different: Martinez and the nurse were 120 miles apart.

Martinez lives in Pueblo, Colo., two hours away from the nearest VA locations with in-house doctors and nurse practitioners.

His nurse practitioner is based in Alamosa but provides care for Veterans in smaller clinics in Pueblo and La Junta.

Telehealth consultations can be just as good as in-person consultations. It depends on the medical reason for the visit. For example, if a patient comes in with a cold, a nurse can perform the basic assessment activities on site at the smaller clinic, and have a specialized video camera pointed in the patient’s ear, nose and throat.

Martinez, new to Telehealth, describes his experience. “It’s a good idea, especially because I’m not much for long-distance driving.”

Although he missed the hands-on experience, he was happy he had medical expertise on hand when he needed it, without spending hours driving.

In some regions, there is not a dense enough Veteran population to allow for a fully-staffed medical center. Telehealth provides access to quality health care for Veterans in many rural areas.

“Nobody likes that three-hour drive.”

Bill Morgan is an army Veteran who lives near Craig, Colo. He loves his rural home, but it means he drives 160 miles to the nearest VA Medical Center in Grand Junction, Colo. He requires a blood test once a month, so he appreciates having access to Telehealth through the VA clinic in Craig.

“It saves me a trip all the way to Grand Junction. Nobody likes that three-hour drive, especially in the winter,” said Morgan.

In addition to regular medical check-ups and blood tests, Morgan participates in MOVE!, VA’s national weight management program.

Telehealth lends itself to the MOVE! program because it is difficult to find necessary staff to participate in each rural location. Several VA clinics now host MOVE! sessions via videoconferencing to larger medical centers. Other programs include diabetic education and smoking cessation.

Morgan likes the Telehealth program. “Telehealth is convenient, the staff takes great care of me, and it saves me a lot of time,” he says.

Source Article from http://www.va.gov/health/NewsFeatures/20120924a.asp

Senate Blocks Critical Veterans Jobs Bill

Senate Blocks Critical Veterans Jobs Bill

CONTACT: Hallie Seegal (212) 982-9699 or hallie@iava.org

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday, September 19, 2012
Follow us on Twitter.com/IAVA

Senate Blocks Critical Veterans Jobs Bill

 

IAVA blasts Congress for putting politics ahead of supporting veterans

NEW YORK – Today, Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA), the nation’s first and largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization for veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, expressed outrage at the Senate’s failure to pass the Veterans Job Corps Act (VJC) – which would help put thousands of young veterans back to work. With Congress shutting down to campaign, no employment legislation will pass until after the election. And with the unemployment rate officially at 10.9%, veterans across the country are left treading water while Congress blocks legislation with procedural tricks.

“This Congress let partisan bickering stand in the way of putting thousands of America’s heroes back to work. Lowering veteran unemployment is something both parties should be able to agree on – even in an election year,” said IAVA Founder and Chief Executive Officer Paul Rieckhoff. “Election politics should never stand in the way of creating job opportunities for our nation’s veterans, especially with an official 10.9% unemployment rate. We hope constituents, veterans and their families across the country will hold the Senate accountable for this failure.”

“The blockage of the Veterans Job Corps Act, a bipartisan effort authored by Senators Murray, Burr, Boozman, Heller and Toomey, should outrage all Americans. This bill was smart bipartisan policy that would put veterans back into service for their communities as policemen, firefighters and first responders. The result of today’s vote creates tremendous doubt that this Congress will be able to pass any additional veterans legislation in 2012. Iraq and Afghanistan veterans should not have to wait until 2013 for critical support from Congress.”

In addition to creating jobs for veterans as police officers, firefighters, first responders, and restorative conservationists, the Veterans Job Corps Act would have also extended the critical Transition Assistance Program (TAP). TAP provides employment, education and entrepreneurship advice for troops separating from the service, and to veterans and their spouses after they’ve left the military. The VJC would also require states to consider military training and experience in granting credentials and licensure for EMTs, nursing assistants and commercial driver’s licenses.

Click here for today’s full vote roll call.

IAVA’s work has helped hundreds of veterans get back to work and find unemployment support after their service. Innovative employment programs with companies ranging from jcpenney to McKinsey to PIMCO are making a significant impact and establishing a model for replication. For more recommendations on how to tackle veteran unemployment across the public and private sectors, read IAVA’s Policy Agenda here.

If you are a member of the media who wishes to arrange an interview with IAVA Founder and Chief Executive Officer Paul Rieckhoff, IAVA Chief Policy Officer Tom Tarantino or an IAVA Member Veteran struggling to find employment, please contact Hallie Seegal at (212) 982-9699 or hallie@iava.org.

Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (www.IAVA.org) is the country’s first and largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization for veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and has more than 200,000 Member Veterans and civilian supporters nationwide. Its mission is to improve the lives of this country’s newest generation of veterans and their families.

 
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