Archives for July 2013

New Veterans Survey: 30 Percent Have Considered Taking Their Own Life

New Veterans Survey: 30 Percent Have Considered Taking Their Own Life

CONTACT: Carlisle Williams (212) 982-9699 or press@iava.org

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/iava

New Veterans Survey: 30 Percent Have Considered Taking Their Own Life 

IAVA’s Annual Member Survey Also Indicates Disapproval of the President and Congress on Veterans Issues

NEW YORK (July 31, 2013) – According to a new survey completed by Iraq and Afghanistan veterans, 30 percent of members have considered taking their own life, while 45 percent of respondents know an Iraq or Afghanistan veteran who has attempted suicide. That is one critical finding from Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America’s (IAVA) 2013 Annual Member Survey, released today.  Member veterans provided insight into a number of vital issues, including education, employment, the disability claims backlog, mental health, and support for female veterans.  

The 2013 survey highlights some alarming downward trends in veteran care.  Forty-three percent of respondents said they did not seek care for mental health issues because of a perceived negative impact on their career, a 22 percent increase from IAVA’s 2012 survey. Forty percent of respondents have a disability claim pending with the VA.  Sixty percent of female respondents do not have a positive view of the VA’s care of women.

The survey also indicates veterans do not believe the President and Congress are doing enough for veterans.  Forty-four percent of respondents rank the President’s performance on improving the lives of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans as poor.  Fifty-five percent rank Congress’ performance on improving the lives of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans as poor. Furthermore, 66 percent do not think the President listens enough to new veterans and 80 percent do not think Congress listens enough to new veterans.

One area where respondents had a positive response is education. Eighty-four percent of respondents in school are satisfied with their education programs, with more than two-thirds currently using New GI Bill benefits. 

The full 2013 Annual Member Survey is available for download here.

Additional highlights from the survey include:

Mental Health:

•80% of new veterans don’t believe troops and veterans are getting the care and support needed for mental health injuries

•37% know an Iraq or Afghanistan veteran who committed suicide

Women Veterans:

•62% of female respondents do not have a positive view of the VA’s care for women

Claims:

•40% of respondents have a claim pending with the VA, while 65% of disability claims are related to PTSD

Education:

•42% of respondents or their dependents either are using or have used the New GI Bill

Employment:

•45% of respondents who are unemployed have been unemployed for one year or longer

“The annual survey is one of the largest surveys of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans and serves as an opportunity to hear from our members on the defining issues affecting the New Greatest Generation.  These findings are instrumental in shaping our policy priorities and informing our work to improve the lives of all veterans and their families,” said Derek Bennett, IAVA Chief of Staff. “On issues critical to veterans – including mental health care and disability claims – it’s clear that they deserve better.”

IAVA works closely with the Military and Veteran Crisis Line to ensure that every service member, veteran, family member and provider knows that there is free and confidential help available 24 hours a day through phone, text and online. Veterans, or those concerned about veterans, can call 800-273-8255 and press 1 to be directly connected to qualified responders.

Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (www.IAVA.org) is the nation’s first and largest nonpartisan, nonprofit organization representing veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan and has more than 270,000 Member Veterans and civilian supporters nationwide. IAVA recently received the highest rating – four-stars – from Charity Navigator, America’s largest charity evaluator. 

# # #

VA Under Secretary for Benefits letter to school certifying officialsne

%PDF-1.5 %
57 0 obj > endobj
64 0 obj >/Filter/FlateDecode/ID[]/Index[57 12]/Info 56 0 R/Length 55/Prev 461019/Root 58 0 R/Size 69/Type/XRef/W[1 2 1]>>stream
hbbd“b`$@= b\@t&F F@

Source Article from http://gibill.va.gov/documents/letters/USB_Letter_July2013.pdf

Post-9/11 GI Bill Celebrates Fourth Anniversary








Post-9/11 GI Bill Celebrates Fourth Anniversary

July 29, 2013






Nearly 1 Million Veterans, Servicemembers and Families Benefit


Thursday, August 1, marks the fourth anniversary of the Post-9/11 GI Bill.  VA has issued approximately $30 billion in Post 9/11 GI-Bill benefit payments since its inception in August 2009 and helped nearly 1 million Servicemembers, Veterans, and their families pursue their education. 


“The Post-9/11 GI Bill has helped many of our Nation’s Veterans pursue their education and successfully transition to civilian life,” said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki. “We’re proud that the Department of Veterans Affairs can administer this important benefit that makes such a big difference in the lives of nearly a million Veterans and their families.”


The Post-9/11 GI Bill is the most extensive educational assistance program since the Serviceman’s Readjustment Act of 1944, more commonly known as the GI Bill, was signed into law.  


The Post-9/11 GI Bill provides comprehensive educational support through tuition, books and housing allowance to people with at least 90 days of total service after September 10, 2001, or people discharged with a service-connected disability after 30 days.  


Approved training under the Post-9/11 GI Bill includes graduate and undergraduate degrees, vocational and technical training, on-the-job training, flight training, correspondence training, licensing and national testing programs, entrepreneurship training, and tutorial assistance.


VA is now processing benefit payments for currently enrolled students in an average of seven days, largely as a result of VA’s ongoing transformation to electronic claims processing.   The delivery of Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits has been automated and processing time cut in half through implementation of VA’s Long Term Solution, an end-to-end claims processing system that uses rules-based, industry-standard technologies.  


“Since the end of World War II, GI Bill programs have shaped and changed the lives of Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and their survivors by helping them reach their educational and employment goals,” said Allison A. Hickey, Under Secretary for Benefits. “That is still true today.”


In April 2012, President Obama signed Executive Order 13607 which established the Principles of Excellence, offering guidelines that promote student success under the program and ensure accurate information about institutions and their courses.  Over 6,000 educational and training institutions have agreed to comply with these principles.


“The Principles of Excellence, further strengthened by Public Law 112-249, provide future student Veterans with greater consumer education” said Michael Dakduk, executive director of Student Veterans of America. “It is extremely important to have the right tools and information before making a decision on a post-secondary credential, degree program, or institution of higher learning.” 


VA is working with schools, community organizations and other partners to ensure beneficiaries have all the information they need to use their education benefits, including:


  • Education plans for all military and Veteran education beneficiaries;

  • A designated point of contact for academic and financial advice at each school; and

  • An end to fraudulent and aggressive recruiting techniques and misrepresentation.


This summer, VA is launching new tools to help beneficiaries learn more about their vocational aptitudes and select an education institution.  


  • The ‘Factors to Consider When Choosing a School’ guide offers future students steps to take when researching, choosing, and attending a school.

  • CareerScope® is a free, new tool featured on http://www.gibill.va.gov that measures a student’s aptitude and interests through a self-administered online test, identifying potential career paths.

  • The new GI Bill® Comparison Tool allows students to research and compare schools, including key indicators like average student loan debt and graduation rates.


“We will continue to work hard to improve VA’s benefits delivery process for Post-9/11 GI Bill beneficiaries and to ensure that Veterans and their families have the tools they need to choose the right education institution to help them build a foundation for the future,” Hickey added.


For more information on the Post-9/11 GI Bill and other Veteran education programs, visit http://www.gibill.va.gov.


 #    #    #




People wishing to receive e-mail from VA with the latest news releases and updated fact sheets can subscribe to the
VA Office of Public Affairs Distribution List.


Back to News Releases Index




Your browser doesn’t support JavaScript. You can enable JavaScript via IE browser tool menu.





Source Article from http://www.va.gov/opa/pressrel/PressArtInternet.cfm?id=2460

Secretary Shinseki’s Remarks at the Ceremony to Commemorate the 60th Anniversary of the Korean War Armistice








Secretary Shinseki’s Remarks at the Ceremony to Commemorate the 60th Anniversary of the Korean War Armistice

July 29, 2013






Secretary Shinseki’s remarks from the July 27 Ceremony at the Korean War Memorial:


Mr. President, distinguished guests, especially our guests from Korea; fellow Veterans; ladies and gentlemen:


            Six decades ago, the guns fell silent all along the 38th parallel in Korea, ending more than three and a half years of bloodshed, destruction, and enormous suffering. Today’s ceremony honors the extraordinary courage of those, from all our nations, who fought, bled, died, went missing, suffered brutal captivity, and triumphed there.    


            More than 1.7 million Americans fought in Korea—on pieces of terrain nicknamed Pork Chop Hill and Heartbreak Ridge; in towns and places like Chipyong-ni, Pusan, and Chosin Reservoir; and in unnamed locations known only by grid coordinates and hilltop elevations.


            T.R. Fehrenbach’s definitive work, This Kind of War, chronicles timeless lessons about military readiness that were re-learned in Korea and it provides this oft-cited quotation:


            “. . . You may fly over a land forever; you may bomb it, atomize it, pulverize it and wipe it clean of life–but if you desire to defend it, protect it, and keep it for civilization, you must do this on the ground, the way the Roman Legions did, by putting your young men into the mud.”


            The Veterans we honor today were the young we sent to the mud of Korea with little notice. The lessons are many, as are the arguments about how they should have been better prepared and equipped to fight that expeditionary mission. What is unarguable, however, is the heroism with which these Veterans performed their missions. They rose above all questions of readiness to preserve the freedom of the South Korean people.


Today, we honor all Veterans, who served so courageously in Korea, and we thank their families for their service and sacrifice. Kapshi Kapshida!  [We Go Together]


God bless our Veterans, and may God continue to bless this wonderful country of ours. Thank you




People wishing to receive e-mail from VA with the latest news releases and updated fact sheets can subscribe to the
VA Office of Public Affairs Distribution List.


Back to News Releases Index




Your browser doesn’t support JavaScript. You can enable JavaScript via IE browser tool menu.





Source Article from http://www.va.gov/opa/pressrel/PressArtInternet.cfm?id=2461

VA Health Care Facilities Named to 2013 ‘Most Wired’ Hospitals List








VA Health Care Facilities Named to 2013 “Most Wired” Hospitals List

July 22, 2013






WASHINGTON – The Department of Veterans Affairs, representing 152 VA medical centers, was recently named to the 2013 “Most Wired” hospitals list. The list, which is released by Hospitals & Health Networks, in partnership with McKesson, the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives (CHIME) and the American Hospital Association (AHA), is the result of a national survey aimed at ranking hospitals that are leveraging health information technology (HIT) in new and innovative ways. 


“At VA, we are committed to expanding access to high quality care for our Nation’s Veterans,” said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki.  “As the nation’s largest health network, VA is continuously working to improve and enhance our understanding of which technologies best meet the needs of our Veteran patients.”


Over the past year, VA has provided Veterans and VA health care teams with 21st century health care through the use of new and innovative technology.  Some examples are:


  • telehealth being used in Veterans homes as an adjunct to traditional face-to-face care;

  • recent VA Blue Button enhancements that allow improved access to critical patient medical information;

  • deployment of asset tracking devices;

  • the use of technology to better link specialty care providers to primary care physicians in rural areas.


The survey, which was conducted between Jan. 15, 2013 and March 15, 2013, polled 1,713 hospitals and health systems nationwide to answer questions regarding their information technology (IT) initiatives.  Overall, roughly 30 percent of all U.S. hospitals were surveyed.


“VA is honored to have its integrated health care system on the ‘Most Wired’ hospitals list for the first time ever,” said Dr. Robert Petzel, Undersecretary for Health in the Department of Veterans Affairs. “VA is dedicated to providing Veteran patients with the best experience possible.  Integrating health IT into our everyday processes throughout our vast health care system has helped us to accomplish that goal. This recognition and this year’s 10th anniversary of the introduction of VA’s Personal Health Record, My HealtheVet, indicate we’ve made great strides in accomplishing our goals, and we’re eager to build on this progress.”


With this designation, for the first time, all VA medical centers nationwide were named to the 2013 “Most Wired” list.  The location of VA medical centers can be found here: http://www.va.gov/directory/guide/home.asp.


The full list of 2013’s “Most Wired” hospitals and the entire report can be found in the July H&HN cover story detailing results, available at www.hhnmag.com.


For more information, contact VA Media Relations or visit www.va.gov.


#   #   #




People wishing to receive e-mail from VA with the latest news releases and updated fact sheets can subscribe to the
VA Office of Public Affairs Distribution List.


Back to News Releases Index




Your browser doesn’t support JavaScript. You can enable JavaScript via IE browser tool menu.





Source Article from http://www.va.gov/opa/pressrel/PressArtInternet.cfm?id=2459

Choices, Choices: Shared Decision Making Can Help



A woman and her aged father speak with a doctor

Shared Decision Making has important advantages for all Veterans.










Making Decisions about Health Care in the Future


Do you need to make a decision about your health care or treatment in the near future? Do you want to be involved in making that choice? Then “Shared Decision Making” is for you.


“Shared Decision Making” ensures that the health care decision making process is centered on the patient. It involves family, support people and caregivers and the health care team including the social worker. It should be a collaborative process.


Watch this video, produced by the Informed Medical Decision Foundation, for an overview of Shared Decision Making.


What is “Preference Sensitive?”


When decisions are “preference sensitive” — meaning that what is important to you can be a key factor in the final decision — Shared Decision Making can help.


Examples of preference sensitive decisions include treatment choices for breast or prostate cancer as well as decisions about long term care also known as long term services and supports.


For shared decision making to work you need to:


  • Consider your needs
  • Learn about your options
  • Involve your family, caregiver, or other support person
  • Discuss possible choices with your health care team and social worker

Decision aids help you consider your needs and learn about your options in an unbiased way. Decision aids include information you need to make decisions, as well as tools to help you think about options. They can consist of online guides, printed materials, worksheets that help assess priorities and options and videos — used alone or in combination.


 I’m old enough to know what I want. 


Advantages of Shared Decision Making


When making decisions about long term care services and supports Shared Decision Making is a great approach. Three key advantages are:


  1. You can have a say in your care choices — using Shared Decision Making promotes self-determination and autonomy. If you are not informed and involved, someone else will be deciding for you.
  2. You may be able to avoid or relieve the burden on family caregivers — for example, if you have explored options and discussed your preferences with others, then it will be easier and less stressful for family members to help you make choices in a crisis situation.
  3. You may avoid or delay the need for institutional long term care — by getting the services you need in your own home. Many Veterans and family members are not aware of the range of services available and “tough” it out until the situation is serious and a nursing home seems like the only option.

Visit VA’s online Guide to Long Term Care to learn how Shared Decision Making can be used for long term care decisions. The Guide is a comprehensive decision aid and includes the information you need about long term care options in the home or other settings.


Read the overview of the Shared Decision Making process, and use the worksheets for Veterans and caregivers that will set you up for success when you talk with your VA health care team.



An elderly man and woman sit on a couch

Mary and Bob Hammar, 2013


“Avoid planning on the fly in a crisis.”


Korean War Veteran, Bob Hammar, says, “I used a decision aid to figure out what I wanted to do about my prostate cancer diagnosis in 2005. This year, I used decision aids to prepare for an appointment with my VA provider. My older brother, an Army Veteran, has been pretty healthy, but the reality is he’s 85. He told me to check out the VA’s online Guide to Long Term Care.


“From the Guide, I learned about options that might work for me both in my home and in my community near Tacoma, Washington. I especially liked the section on Shared Decision Making. I printed off the Worksheet for Veterans and filled it out. I’m old enough to know what I want, which is to make my preferences known while I still can. The Worksheet prompted me to consider a few things I hadn’t thought about.


“My wife, Mary, filled out the Caregiver Self-Assessment decision aid. We know our situation could change based on my health or hers. But, I’ve watched what’s happened with my friends and neighbors — heart failure, falls, all kinds of cancer and Parkinson’s. I may not be able to avoid a health crisis, but I can avoid planning on the fly in the midst of a crisis. I want to stay in my own home, if at all possible. And, I want to be prepared for the future. It’s really not that different than having our armed forces prepared to defend our great nation.”


“Maybe it’s time for you to think about how you might meet your long term care needs. I’m glad my brother told me to check out VA’s Guide to Long Term Care — even if he bleeds green and I bleed blue!”







Source Article from http://www.va.gov/health/NewsFeatures/2013/July/Choices-Choices-Shared-Decision-Making-Can-Help.asp

VA Health Care Facilities Named to 2013 ‘Most Wired’ Hospitals List








VA Health Care Facilities Named to 2013 “Most Wired” Hospitals List

July 22, 2013






WASHINGTON – The Department of Veterans Affairs, representing 152 VA medical centers, was recently named to the 2013 “Most Wired” hospitals list. The list, which is released by Hospitals & Health Networks, in partnership with McKesson, the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives (CHIME) and the American Hospital Association (AHA), is the result of a national survey aimed at ranking hospitals that are leveraging health information technology (HIT) in new and innovative ways. 


“At VA, we are committed to expanding access to high quality care for our Nation’s Veterans,” said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki.  “As the nation’s largest health network, VA is continuously working to improve and enhance our understanding of which technologies best meet the needs of our Veteran patients.”


Over the past year, VA has provided Veterans and VA health care teams with 21st century health care through the use of new and innovative technology.  Some examples are:


  • telehealth being used in Veterans homes as an adjunct to traditional face-to-face care;

  • recent VA Blue Button enhancements that allow improved access to critical patient medical information;

  • deployment of asset tracking devices;

  • the use of technology to better link specialty care providers to primary care physicians in rural areas.


The survey, which was conducted between Jan. 15, 2013 and March 15, 2013, polled 1,713 hospitals and health systems nationwide to answer questions regarding their information technology (IT) initiatives.  Overall, roughly 30 percent of all U.S. hospitals were surveyed.


“VA is honored to have its integrated health care system on the ‘Most Wired’ hospitals list for the first time ever,” said Dr. Robert Petzel, Undersecretary for Health in the Department of Veterans Affairs. “VA is dedicated to providing Veteran patients with the best experience possible.  Integrating health IT into our everyday processes throughout our vast health care system has helped us to accomplish that goal. This recognition and this year’s 10th anniversary of the introduction of VA’s Personal Health Record, My HealtheVet, indicate we’ve made great strides in accomplishing our goals, and we’re eager to build on this progress.”


With this designation, for the first time, all VA medical centers nationwide were named to the 2013 “Most Wired” list.  The location of VA medical centers can be found here: http://www.va.gov/directory/guide/home.asp.


The full list of 2013’s “Most Wired” hospitals and the entire report can be found in the July H&HN cover story detailing results, available at www.hhnmag.com.


For more information, contact VA Media Relations or visit www.va.gov.


#   #   #




People wishing to receive e-mail from VA with the latest news releases and updated fact sheets can subscribe to the
VA Office of Public Affairs Distribution List.


Back to News Releases Index




Your browser doesn’t support JavaScript. You can enable JavaScript via IE browser tool menu.





Source Article from http://www.va.gov/opa/pressrel/PressArtInternet.cfm?id=2459

VA Health Care Facilities Named to 2013 ‘Most Wired’ Hospitals List








VA Health Care Facilities Named to 2013 “Most Wired” Hospitals List

July 22, 2013






WASHINGTON – The Department of Veterans Affairs, representing 152 VA medical centers, was recently named to the 2013 “Most Wired” hospitals list. The list, which is released by Hospitals & Health Networks, in partnership with McKesson, the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives (CHIME) and the American Hospital Association (AHA), is the result of a national survey aimed at ranking hospitals that are leveraging health information technology (HIT) in new and innovative ways. 


“At VA, we are committed to expanding access to high quality care for our Nation’s Veterans,” said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki.  “As the nation’s largest health network, VA is continuously working to improve and enhance our understanding of which technologies best meet the needs of our Veteran patients.”


Over the past year, VA has provided Veterans and VA health care teams with 21st century health care through the use of new and innovative technology.  Some examples are:


  • telehealth being used in Veterans homes as an adjunct to traditional face-to-face care;

  • recent VA Blue Button enhancements that allow improved access to critical patient medical information;

  • deployment of asset tracking devices;

  • the use of technology to better link specialty care providers to primary care physicians in rural areas.


The survey, which was conducted between Jan. 15, 2013 and March 15, 2013, polled 1,713 hospitals and health systems nationwide to answer questions regarding their information technology (IT) initiatives.  Overall, roughly 30 percent of all U.S. hospitals were surveyed.


“VA is honored to have its integrated health care system on the ‘Most Wired’ hospitals list for the first time ever,” said Dr. Robert Petzel, Undersecretary for Health in the Department of Veterans Affairs. “VA is dedicated to providing Veteran patients with the best experience possible.  Integrating health IT into our everyday processes throughout our vast health care system has helped us to accomplish that goal. This recognition and this year’s 10th anniversary of the introduction of VA’s Personal Health Record, My HealtheVet, indicate we’ve made great strides in accomplishing our goals, and we’re eager to build on this progress.”


With this designation, for the first time, all VA medical centers nationwide were named to the 2013 “Most Wired” list.  The location of VA medical centers can be found here: http://www.va.gov/directory/guide/home.asp.


The full list of 2013’s “Most Wired” hospitals and the entire report can be found in the July H&HN cover story detailing results, available at www.hhnmag.com.


For more information, contact VA Media Relations or visit www.va.gov.


#   #   #




People wishing to receive e-mail from VA with the latest news releases and updated fact sheets can subscribe to the
VA Office of Public Affairs Distribution List.


Back to News Releases Index




Your browser doesn’t support JavaScript. You can enable JavaScript via IE browser tool menu.





Source Article from http://www.va.gov/opa/pressrel/PressArtInternet.cfm?id=2459

Can You Name Medical Centers Named for Presidents?



Black and white photo of a soldier standing in front of a painted backdrop

Capt. Harry Truman in 1918, during World War I. (NARA photo)










Even the most powerful man in the western hemisphere, the United States president, doesn’t always get his way.


Such was the case with President Harry S. Truman. He was a humble, yet headstrong, man who made it known on many occasions that he never wanted buildings named after him. But, just as former President Franklin D. Roosevelt didn’t have any say when President Truman named the Montrose VA hospital after Roosevelt months after his death in 1945, so it was with President Truman when a Veterans Administration hospital was named in his honor.


In 1950, in the midst of President Truman’s second term, the first attempt was made to designate a new Veterans hospital in Brooklyn, New York, after him, but he bristled. Not until 25 years later would that mission be successfully accomplished.



Black and white photo of President Truman shaking the hand of a man in a wheelchair

President Truman shaking hands with Japanese American soldier Pfc Wilson H. Makabe. (NARA/Truman Library photo)


Thirty years after a VA hospital was first named after a U.S. president (Montrose named after President Franklin D. Roosevelt), a second VA hospital was bestowed with a presidential honorary name. On January 2, 1975, Public Law 93-602 authorized designation of the Columbia, Missouri, VA hospital after President Harry S. Truman. The Columbia, Mo., VA hospital officially opened on April 5, 1972. President Truman died on December 26, 1972, so the 1975 honorary designation was a posthumous one.


Harry S. Truman was the first of two World War I Veterans to become an American president.


Harry S. Truman was the first of two World War I Veterans to become an American president; Dwight D. Eisenhower was the second. When Truman assumed that office after President Franklin D. Roosevelt died (just a few months into his fourth term), he was the first military Veteran in nearly 40 years to serve as U.S. president. The last military Veteran elected president before Truman was Teddy Roosevelt, a Spanish American War Veteran, who served from 1901-1909. Harry Truman was re-elected president for a second term in 1948 and served as the 33rd U.S. president from 1945-1953.


Prior to becoming president, Harry Truman served in the Missouri National Guard from 1905 to 1911; from 1917 to 1919 he served in the 129th Field Artillery and commanded Battery D during World War 1; he was promoted to the rank of Captain.


President Truman was a descendant of Revolutionary War 1st Lt. James Holmes, 2nd Virginia State Regiment, and was approved for membership in the National Society Sons of the Revolution in 1967. He was also a member of the following Veterans’ organizations: Veterans of Foreign Wars, American Legion, Reserve Officers Association of the United States, Army and Navy Club, 35th Division Association, Military Country Club, and Military Order of the World War.


Links:





Source Article from http://www.va.gov/health/NewsFeatures/2013/July/Can-You-Name-Medical-Centers-Named-for-Presidents.asp

VA Health Care Facilities Named to 2013 ‘Most Wired’ Hospitals List








VA Health Care Facilities Named to 2013 “Most Wired” Hospitals List

July 22, 2013






WASHINGTON – The Department of Veterans Affairs, representing 152 VA medical centers, was recently named to the 2013 “Most Wired” hospitals list. The list, which is released by Hospitals & Health Networks, in partnership with McKesson, the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives (CHIME) and the American Hospital Association (AHA), is the result of a national survey aimed at ranking hospitals that are leveraging health information technology (HIT) in new and innovative ways. 


“At VA, we are committed to expanding access to high quality care for our Nation’s Veterans,” said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki.  “As the nation’s largest health network, VA is continuously working to improve and enhance our understanding of which technologies best meet the needs of our Veteran patients.”


Over the past year, VA has provided Veterans and VA health care teams with 21st century health care through the use of new and innovative technology.  Some examples are:


  • telehealth being used in Veterans homes as an adjunct to traditional face-to-face care;

  • recent VA Blue Button enhancements that allow improved access to critical patient medical information;

  • deployment of asset tracking devices;

  • the use of technology to better link specialty care providers to primary care physicians in rural areas.


The survey, which was conducted between Jan. 15, 2013 and March 15, 2013, polled 1,713 hospitals and health systems nationwide to answer questions regarding their information technology (IT) initiatives.  Overall, roughly 30 percent of all U.S. hospitals were surveyed.


“VA is honored to have its integrated health care system on the ‘Most Wired’ hospitals list for the first time ever,” said Dr. Robert Petzel, Undersecretary for Health in the Department of Veterans Affairs. “VA is dedicated to providing Veteran patients with the best experience possible.  Integrating health IT into our everyday processes throughout our vast health care system has helped us to accomplish that goal. This recognition and this year’s 10th anniversary of the introduction of VA’s Personal Health Record, My HealtheVet, indicate we’ve made great strides in accomplishing our goals, and we’re eager to build on this progress.”


With this designation, for the first time, all VA medical centers nationwide were named to the 2013 “Most Wired” list.  The location of VA medical centers can be found here: http://www.va.gov/directory/guide/home.asp.


The full list of 2013’s “Most Wired” hospitals and the entire report can be found in the July H&HN cover story detailing results, available at www.hhnmag.com.


For more information, contact VA Media Relations or visit www.va.gov.


#   #   #




People wishing to receive e-mail from VA with the latest news releases and updated fact sheets can subscribe to the
VA Office of Public Affairs Distribution List.


Back to News Releases Index




Your browser doesn’t support JavaScript. You can enable JavaScript via IE browser tool menu.





Source Article from http://www.va.gov/opa/pressrel/PressArtInternet.cfm?id=2459


SEO Powered By SEOPressor
Skip to toolbar